Tummy Tuck

An abdominoplasty, commonly referred to as a “tummy tuck”, is an operation to remove excess abdominal skin and fat and, in most cases, tightens the abdominal muscles at the same time. A tummy tuck corrects unwanted abdominal bulges, improves your waistline, tightens your skin and improves the appearance of your belly button.

The tummy tuck surgery is performed under general anaesthetic and usually requires a one to two night stay in hospital with full recovery in two to six weeks.



Anyone who has excess and unwanted lower abdominal skin and/or fat following pregnancy or weight loss.

No amount of exercise or weight loss can remove extra lower abdominal skin. In this situation an abdominoplasty (tummy tuck) is the only operation that will remove all of the unwanted skin as well as any fat bulges.

An abdominoplasty should not be chosen as a means to lose weight. The tummy tuck operation is designed to remove excess skin and any fat associated with excessive the skin.

If you are losing weight, the best results are achieved when you are at, or are very close to, your target weight. After losing weight there be excessive skin and this will be removed as part of the tummy tuck operation.

If you are a woman who is considering a tummy tuck (abdominoplasty), yet planning to have children, then delaying this surgery until you have had children is the best option.

Tummy Tuck

An abdominoplasty, commonly referred to as a “tummy tuck”, is an operation to remove excess abdominal skin and fat and, in most cases, tightens the abdominal muscles at the same time. A tummy tuck corrects unwanted abdominal bulges, improves your waistline, tightens your skin and improves the appearance of your belly button.

The tummy tuck surgery is performed under general anaesthetic and usually requires a one to two night stay in hospital with full recovery in two to six weeks.



Anyone who has excess and unwanted lower abdominal skin and/or fat following pregnancy or weight loss.

No amount of exercise or weight loss can remove extra lower abdominal skin. In this situation an abdominoplasty (tummy tuck) is the only operation that will remove all of the unwanted skin as well as any fat bulges.

An abdominoplasty should not be chosen as a means to lose weight. The tummy tuck operation is designed to remove excess skin and any fat associated with excessive the skin.

If you are losing weight, the best results are achieved when you are at, or are very close to, your target weight. After losing weight there be excessive skin and this will be removed as part of the tummy tuck operation.

If you are a woman who is considering a tummy tuck (abdominoplasty), yet planning to have children, then delaying this surgery until you have had children is the best option.

 

Dr Broadhurst will review your past medical history including any previous abdominal (tummy tuck) operations and any medications you may be taking.

A thorough clinical examination will be performed to determine the exact areas of your skin and fat excess as well as assessing your abdominal muscles for signs of hernias or muscle bulges. It’s only after this examination that an assessment can be made about whether an abdominoplasty (tummy tuck) is the best option for you. If so, Dr Broadhurst will then discuss in detail your wishes and expectations and how these can best be met with tummy tuck surgery.

The operation will then be explained to you including what you should expect after tummy tuck surgery.

A further consultation will be scheduled to ensure you completely understand the tummy tuck procedure and to give you a chance to ask any further questions. A date for your tummy tuck operation will be chosen and you will be given an information pack that contains the operation day and time, where to go, what to bring, diet restrictions and related items.

Dr Broadhurst will review your past medical history including any previous abdominal (tummy tuck) operations and any medications you may be taking.

A thorough clinical examination will be performed to determine the exact areas of your skin and fat excess as well as assessing your abdominal muscles for signs of hernias or muscle bulges. It’s only after this examination that an assessment can be made about whether an abdominoplasty (tummy tuck) is the best option for you. If so, Dr Broadhurst will then discuss in detail your wishes and expectations and how these can best be met with tummy tuck surgery.

The operation will then be explained to you including what you should expect after tummy tuck surgery.

A further consultation will be scheduled to ensure you completely understand the tummy tuck procedure and to give you a chance to ask any further questions. A date for your tummy tuck operation will be chosen and you will be given an information pack that contains the operation day and time, where to go, what to bring, diet restrictions and related items.

 

After arriving at the hospital there will be some paperwork that must be completed including admission forms.

You will meet your anaesthetist who will discuss the details of your general anaesthetic and your options for pain relief following your operation.

Dr Broadhurst will see you to answer any final questions before the tummy tuck surgery. He will then draw markings on your abdomen where the incisions will take place.

After completing the pre-operative formalities you will be taken to the operating theatre.

Under a general anaesthetic an incision in your lower abdomen will be made and all the excess skin and fat removed.

At the completion of the procedure all of the incisions will be stitched with internal dissolving sutures. Two small plastic drainage tubes will be inserted and will exit through the skin at each end of your abdominal scar. Similarly, your belly button will be brought out through the skin in its new position and stitched with dissolving stitches. A dressing and support garment will be fitted and you will be taken to the recovery area. After you are fully awake you will return to the ward where you will rest for the remainder of the day.

Dr Broadhurst will visit you later in the day to ensure you are comfortable. The following day you will be allowed to shower and take short walks. It is important to remain mobile to minimise the risk of blood clots (DVTs) in your legs, but not so much that it interferes with the healing process. The nursing staff will be on hand to assist you with showering and getting in and out of bed until you are comfortable managing on your own. You are free to eat, drink and walk around the hospital as desired.

On the second day your drainage tubes will be removed and you will be allowed to return home. The dressing that’s applied can get wet but should be patted dry before you get dressed. Once home it is important that you spend time resting with your hips flexed. Short walks around the house will help minimize the risk of DVTs but, again, take it easy so you don’t jeopardise the healing of your abdominal wounds.

Your abdominal muscles and skin will feel very tight and most people are unable to stand up straight during the first week after their operation. The tightness gradually subsides and by the end of the second week you will be able to stand up and walk around comfortably.

You will be discharged home with painkillers which you can take as required.

You should be able to return to work after two weeks provided your work does not involve heavy lifting or physical activity. For jobs involving strenuous physical activity it may take four to six weeks.

After arriving at the hospital there will be some paperwork that must be completed including admission forms.

You will meet your anaesthetist who will discuss the details of your general anaesthetic and your options for pain relief following your operation.

Dr Broadhurst will see you to answer any final questions before the tummy tuck surgery. He will then draw markings on your abdomen where the incisions will take place.

After completing the pre-operative formalities you will be taken to the operating theatre.

Under a general anaesthetic an incision in your lower abdomen will be made and all the excess skin and fat removed.

At the completion of the procedure all of the incisions will be stitched with internal dissolving sutures. Two small plastic drainage tubes will be inserted and will exit through the skin at each end of your abdominal scar. Similarly, your belly button will be brought out through the skin in its new position and stitched with dissolving stitches. A dressing and support garment will be fitted and you will be taken to the recovery area. After you are fully awake you will return to the ward where you will rest for the remainder of the day.

Dr Broadhurst will visit you later in the day to ensure you are comfortable. The following day you will be allowed to shower and take short walks. It is important to remain mobile to minimise the risk of blood clots (DVTs) in your legs, but not so much that it interferes with the healing process. The nursing staff will be on hand to assist you with showering and getting in and out of bed until you are comfortable managing on your own. You are free to eat, drink and walk around the hospital as desired.

On the second day your drainage tubes will be removed and you will be allowed to return home. The dressing that’s applied can get wet but should be patted dry before you get dressed. Once home it is important that you spend time resting with your hips flexed. Short walks around the house will help minimize the risk of DVTs but, again, take it easy so you don’t jeopardise the healing of your abdominal wounds.

Your abdominal muscles and skin will feel very tight and most people are unable to stand up straight during the first week after their operation. The tightness gradually subsides and by the end of the second week you will be able to stand up and walk around comfortably.

You will be discharged home with painkillers which you can take as required.

You should be able to return to work after two weeks provided your work does not involve heavy lifting or physical activity. For jobs involving strenuous physical activity it may take four to six weeks.

 

An appointment will be made with Dr Broadhurst one week after your operation. He will see you again after six weeks and then three, six and 12 months. Extra appointments can be made at any time.

An appointment will be made with Dr Broadhurst one week after your operation. He will see you again after six weeks and then three, six and 12 months. Extra appointments can be made at any time.

 

There are risks involved with any operation and these are the anaesthetic and the tummy tuck operation itself. If you are fit and healthy then the risk of complications is generally very low but Dr Broadhurst will discuss all risks with you prior to your abdominoplasty (tummy tuck).

There are risks involved with any operation and these are the anaesthetic and the tummy tuck operation itself. If you are fit and healthy then the risk of complications is generally very low but Dr Broadhurst will discuss all risks with you prior to your abdominoplasty (tummy tuck).

 
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